Essays by palto

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Phaedo is an account written by Plato of the last conversation of Socrates’ essays by palto he will be put to death by the state of Athens by drinking hemlock. The dialog itself seems to recount Plato’s psychological, Metaphysical, and epistemological beliefs rather than an accurate portrayal of Socrates’ last conversation . Mark Cronin HU 102 – HD April 2, 2012 The Immortality of the Soul in Plato’s Phaedo Among Plato’s dialogues, which serve to honor the realm of philosophy in general and Socrates’s life in particular, the Phaedo dramatically and poignantly portrays the death scene of Socrates.

The Phaedo evokes such tragic sentiments of pity and fear while at the same time glorifies Socrates as the martyr for the truth. Phaedo by Plato The opening of Plato’s Phaedo finds Socrates constructing a defense of the philosophical life. When consideration is given to the status of philosophy in Greece at the end of the fifth century BCE, such a defense seems unnecessary and, at the same time, difficult. In the Apology and Phaedo, as Socrates prepares to die his friends are concerned about him and why he does not fear death, but rather looks forward to this. Plato through Socrates makes this statement of his beliefs of death and what lies beyond this final barrier of consciousness. Plato believes that we live on through our souls and into another body. Socrates faces death with excitement because in his eyes to die is to practice perfect philosophy.

Plato’s final argument in Phaedo for the immortality of the soul is one of the most interesting topics of all time. It goes hand to hand with the application of the theory of forms to the question of the soul’s immortality, as Plato constantly reminds us, the theory of forms is the most certain of all his theories. The Phaedo is Plato’s attempt to convince us of the immortality of the soul by using several main arguments. Plato ‘s final argument in Phaedo for the immortality of the soul is one of the most interesting topics of all time. The argument of whether the soul exists has been debated for years and even today. It goes hand to hand with the application of the theory of forms to the question of the soul ‘s immortality, as Plato constantly reminds us, the theory of forms is the most certain of all his theories.

Each view has their benefits and drawbacks but each play a vital role in the discussion about knowledge. The philosopher Plato is considered to be a rationalist thinker. In Plato’s Phaedo, he shows the reader that the five senses are not what one should rely on. The senses do not provide us with truth.

The Apology and Phaedo by Plato are two different books describing what is like to be a philosopher per Socrates believes. These two books take place in two different scenarios in Socrates’ life, The Apology takes place in a court room where Socrates is to defend himself from false charges brought to him by Meletus who is acting as the prosecutor. Phaedo, on the other hand, takes place in a prison cell post judgment on the day of Socrates execution. Saila Sanders PHIL 011 Altshuler 25 September 2014 Plato’s Phaedo: The Soul and the Body In the Phaedo, Socrates proposes that the soul is immortal. Despite being a seemingly counterintuitive understanding, Socrates offers arguments for the soul’s immortality and expresses his view between the soul, or mind, and the body. Socrates practices reasoning to establish his philosophy on the concept of the soul and all that it necessitates. Olympians, a religion that often tended more towards the rational and philosophic than the longstanding Jewish piety.